Archive for July, 2016

Data is addicting. Like a “runner’s high,” it’s a great feeling when you get that data moving in all the right directions. And the same principles that guide a dedicated running practice can also inform your data culture: look at your data in doses, meaningfully measure how you’re doing, change your routine, measure again, and stay consistent.


Website traffic is moving away from the homepage: most people around the world get their news via mobile devices. In the U.S., engaged time on mobile devices is about
30% greater than on desktop. In an increasingly mobile-first world, understanding how to maximize your mobile audience’s engagement can lead to that repeat effect.


And in comes one of the biggest buzzwords of 2016: “Distribution.” Most of this huge mobile audience is viewing content on new distributed platforms like Facebook Instant Articles and Google AMP — check out the
report from our Lead Data Scientist, Dan Valente backing this up!


Let’s clear up a few things you probably already know:

  1. Facebook Instant Articles aren’t hosted by you – which means you don’t have too much control.
  2. A Google AMP page is your site – meaning you have more control over it.


When you look at the Chartbeat Dashboard, they aren’t bucketed in the same distribution category exactly for that reason: Facebook Instant and AMP articles cater to two separate audiences.

blog-post-distribution

What these platforms have in common is that they were created with the reader in mind to provide a faster, more seamless user experience.


According to our very own
Tony Haile, the average bounce time for a new visitor is 15 seconds. If your site loads slower than that, you’ve already lost your audience before they even reach your content. The average AMP load time is 1.05 seconds. Huge difference: you’re now getting the most out of your traffic by making sure your audience can engage with your quality content in the quickest way possible.


And we’ve seen the payoff from keeping the reader in mind: readers on Instant Articles and AMP pages have an average engaged time of 53 and 52 seconds, respectively, compared to 46 and 38 seconds for regular Facebook and Google traffic referrals. Take that bump in engaged time to recirculate your audience through
your site; include those inline links to other articles.

 

Every indicator in the Chartbeat suite of tools leads to a different understanding of your audience and prompts a different action with your content. Our goal is to provide you with the tools you need to be data-confident in those actions, and this means staying up to date with the industry. With our Instant Articles and AMP integrations, you can be completely confident about adopting these new platforms, because you’ll still have the data you need to understand their unique audiences.


Take cues from Chartbeat tools to measure your efforts and audience, make changes to your content and distribution strategies, measure how those changes affect your traffic and audience engagement, and repeat: soon enough, you’ll be a well-oiled data machine.

Not set up with our Facebook Instant Articles and Google AMP pages integrations yet? We’ve got you covered. Check out the Chartbeat docs to help you set it up: Chartbeat Integration Support Page.

Audience development is about the long game – it’s a marathon, not a sprint. It’s about how the day-to-day successes of individual stories can replicate on a site- or publisher-level, and this can’t be done without first benchmarking team performance against bigger, organizational goals like audience engagement, reach, or revenue.

It’s not just about clicks, or engagement, or concurrent spikes. It’s about optimizing every step of the growth funnel: going from acquiring clicks to converting a new visitor. That’s where editorial analytics come in.

With Chartbeat Publishing, audience analysts can:

 

Take Control of Your Data Logs

Chartbeat Report Builder, our customizable historical reporting tool, enables audience analysts to really dig into the long-term audience behavior trends. Create flexible, custom historical reports according to the criteria and metrics of your choosing.

 

Benchmark Performance Like a Champ

Historical data is the evidence you need to validate or disprove assumptions you might be making about your audience. If you think your site works a particular way, does it actually? Use Report Builder to look back over a week, a month, even a year, and put those assumptions to the test. Mining your historical data with Report Builder can show you whether the little actions taken in real time are summing into larger change.

By subscribing to specific reports, you can have reports sent straight to your inbox automatically on a recurring basis. This gives you a much better sense of week-to-week, month-to-month, or even quarter-to-quarter performance.

 

Build a Collaborative Newsroom Workflow

Report Builder gives you the opportunity to easily share reports with anyone else on your team with just the touch of a button. The days of manually emailing spreadsheets out are gone. Report Builder also helps you inform the rest of the team about what’s working, and more importantly, what isn’t. By being the gate-keeper for historical data, it’s up to you to help the rest of the team create, adapt, and improve ongoing strategies. Align your team around meaningful audience development goals and give everyone the data they need to succeed.

When your whole team is aligned around common tools and meaningful metrics, performance management isn’t just tisking and tasking. It’s about uniting everyone in the newsroom within purposes larger than themselves.

 

Want to see how other team members can put Chartbeat tools to work? Check out the stories for content creators, producerssection editorshomepage editorsmobile editorsvideo editors, and social media managers

For more information on how Chartbeat Publishing helps Audience Development teams make it big, reach out to productoutreach@chartbeat.com.

Source: Al Jazeera

Source: Al Jazeera

From the time the UK referendum on EU membership was announced in February, several hundred articles per day were published on the topic of Brexit. This number broke into the thousands on June 13, ten days before the polling, and peaked at over 22,000 articles on June 24 when the Brexit results were announced.

So what can the data around Brexit teach us about how people read the news, what topics capture their attention and how they use news sources vs social and search? For this post, Chartbeat took a look at how Brexit has been covered and read, tapping into data from our network of more than 50,000 publishers, and we uncovered a few interesting patterns:

  • More coverage does not necessarily mean more reader attention
  • The channels by which readers discover stories change during an event’s lifetime
  • Traffic driven by social and search reflects people’s differing interests in Brexit stories


Let’s dive into each.

 

Media Coverage Does Not Always Equal Reader Attention


It’s not surprising that the media gave high priority coverage to this topic , yet public attention wasn’t quickly swayed toward the referendum. After all, 14 months ago the concern over the EU was only the seventh most important issue on voters’ minds according to Ipsos MORI’s survey, noted by
Peter Preston in his Guardian column.

 

The upper panel on the above chart shows how many articles mentioning Brexit were published across the Chartbeat network on a daily basis, while the lower panel shows how many hours people spent reading those articles. The dashed lines mark some important dates related to the Brexit referendum. To many voters, the polling was like a final exam that didn’t gain proper attention until the last minute.

 

hourly_posts_vs_attention.psd

Zooming into media coverage and reader attention, this second chart shows a similar trend on an hourly basis. It illustrates a “pulse” on both the supply and demand side for each day. However, while the media had a strong beat right at the start of the polling on June 23, people’s reading behavior didn’t echo as strongly until much later.

 

Story Discovery Changes During the Lifetime of a News Event


In terms of total attention, June 23 appears to have been another lukewarm day. However, when we break consumption down by referral type, it actually reveals one of the rare moments when
search traffic catches up with social traffic, highlighted in yellow on the following chart. Why is that worth noting? Social traffic is generally driven by passive browsing of news feeds and the like, whereas search traffic is driven by proactive inquiry of specific questions and topics. For that reason, social traffic tends to beat search traffic, as we see on all days other than the polling on June 23 in the following chart.

What’s also notable here is the spiking traffic driven by internal navigation. It indicates that media companies did a great job promoting Brexit stories on their websites and attracting substantial attention from their audience. When the referendum results were announced on June 24, social traffic had a huge jump, which implies people wanted to talk about it for various reasons, such as victorious joys for the Leave camp, surprise and anger for the Remain camp, consequences for overseas jobs, driver’s licences, pensions, and more.

The search spike from the announcement of the referendum results didn’t last: search traffic dwindled on June 24 as information became sufficiently diffused through social media and other communication channels.

 

hourly_referrer_type_logo_annotated

 

Even Regarding the Same Event, Search and Social Readers Consume Fundamentally Different Stories


The last chart further reveals the gap between the supply and demand for particular types of stories about Brexit. The following chart shows how many articles were published in our network around the same story (or group of articles written about the same topic and covered by various news outlets), and how many hours readers spent engaging with each story.

 

*Engagement measured in hours

The stories shown above are the top 20 as ranked by the number of articles published about that story (visualized in the upper panel). Story volume is generally driven by major events, such as the start and end of the referendum, and major forces, such as power struggles among political figures and fluctuations of financial markets.

However, in the lower three panels, we see that traffic volume, search volume, and social volume, measured by engaged hours, differ across stories. Via search, people sought explanations relevant to themselves beyond mere facts. The top searched stories are generally long-form explainers and analyses, such as “what happens if UK votes to leave” and “economic consequence if Leave wins.”

The top social stories have a distinctly different flavor. Not necessarily informative, they carry more emotions, e.g., “regrets and anger about results,” surprises, e.g., “Farage breaks Brexit pledges,” and oddities, e.g., “Brits Google what the EU is.” Unsurprisingly, Mr. Trump buckles up in the front seat on the social wagon.

Brexit news won’t be slowing down any time soon. With Boris Johnson announcing last week that he will not be running for prime minister, the debate around Scotland’s future, and the halo effect of the UK’s decision on the upcoming US election, we’ll have plenty of news to analyze and report on in the coming months.