Archive for August, 2016

What time of day is the best for social sharing?

Social media strategists are constantly testing and re-testing to find the answer to this timeless question. Of course, time of day nuances will vary based on your specific audience, but we took a look at the wealth of data from sites in our network to see how social traffic compares to overall traffic throughout the day:

 

Social Traffic by Time of Day

The verdict: social traffic substantially underperforms overall traffic from the morning through to the early afternoon, and substantially overperforms overall traffic during evenings and nights. So if your goal is reach, late afternoon through night is the best time to attract readers on social media and get them to click through to your site. And, as you might expect, we see social media strategists adapting to the behaviors of their audience.

Below, we see a graph of how frequently these sites posted to Twitter, compared to their volume of social traffic.

 

Social Traffic and Social Sharing

Posting to twitter is strong all morning and reaches its peak in the afternoon and early evening, as traffic from Twitter dramatically picks up around noon to midnight. By increasing posting when traffic is already its strongest, publishers in our network are capitalizing on reader trends to continue getting their traffic even higher.

Want to put your social data to work? Download our Insider Guide to Getting to Know Your Social Readers.

Scrolling in the Deep

August 10th, 2016 by Katie

To scroll or not to scroll? When 35% of desktop users leave a page before scrolling down at all, you should do whatever you can to capture the attention of the other 65% and make sure they’re actually reading your content.

How readers are moving around on your pages — particularly, how far down the page they’re scrolling — can tell you a lot about how to make your pages more engaging. Take a look at these remarkable statistics about page interactions:

  • The most viewed area of the page is just above the fold. Viewership peaks (just over 80%) at about 550 pixels.
  • The portion of the page below the fold is viewed for nearly three times as long as the top of the page. Pixels at the top of the page are in view for the shortest amount of time — about 4 seconds — and the amount of time in view steadily rises as we move down the page, peaking at around 1200 pixels.
  • Readers who do scroll down past the fold engage much more towards the bottom of the page than they do at the top. We see this represented in the figure below, where we show the amount of time each area of the page was actively viewed by those who scrolled to view it at all.

 

Engagement Across the Page

What does this mean? Don’t just structure your content like every other article out there. Since there’s a large drop-off of readers once you get past the fold, you should touch on your main point early on to speak to all of your readers. When finalizing layout, however, keep in mind how readers typically read and scroll through pages. By setting up your articles to suit these behaviors, you’ll see much more engagement with your content.

Want to learn more about how to improve your layout strategies? Download our checklist for Engaging Article Layout, and get in touch at productoutreach@chartbeat.com.