Author Archive

The Financial Times Talks Ads, Viewability, and Chartbeat with ClickZ

March 13th, 2014 by Juliana

Curious to know what one of the boldest minds in online advertising is thinking about these days? Check out what Jon Slade, Commercial Director for Global Digital Advertising and Insight for the Financial Times, shares in a recent piece by ClickZ, "The Financial Times’ Perspective on Ad Viewability."

In this pithy piece, Slade talks about industry concerns surrounding viewability as it embarks on its path to standardization and the “critical issue” of accurately measuring impressions. We were excited to get a shout-out from Slade, who mentioned the work Chartbeat and the Financial Times have been doing together regarding the application of audience attention metrics to new and premium types of display advertising formats. Slade states:
“In addition to optimizing our site to ensure maximum viewability for our clients, we’re also working with Chartbeat to measure not just whether an ad is seen or not, but for how long. We believe that the amount of time the target audience is exposed to the advertiser’s message has a direct effect on its impact. We can tell our clients how long each impression has been viewed, and the total duration of exposure across the campaign.

In essence, there’s no reason why publishers’ can’t start to trade ‘exposed time’ as a currency, not just impressions. This is a metric that we feel is closer to the actual outcome an advertiser is seeking – impressions themselves are just a convenient mechanism to trade.”

We don’t think we could have said it any better ourselves. In response to this piece, Chartbeat ads product guy Alex Carusillo notes, “Viewability is really important and should happen no matter what. But we think what comes next is the most exciting part. When you look at Active Exposure Time, that black box of viewability opens up and you can see the difference between good and bad impressions. We're lucky to be partnering with Jon and the FT to turn audience attention into something publishers can build businesses on.”

Check out this visualization below to get a sense of how Chartbeat metrics can measure impression quality:

Fake iceberg copy

Do you have questions about this stuff? Or maybe something to say? Let us know in the comments below.

CEO Tony Haile Named to Fast Company’s Most Creative People in Business 1000

January 29th, 2014 by Juliana

 

Tony Haile Chartbeat

Today Fast Company announced the Most Creative People in Business 1000 – with Chartbeat CEO Tony Haile included in the ranks. The MCP 1000 is described as "an influential, diverse group of modern Renaissance men and women across the economy and around the globe. This is more than just a list: It is a rising community, an explosion of creative inspiration, the spur for so much breaking news across the quickly changing industries that Fast Company covers."

Renaissance man, indeed. That baby-faced chap you know and love truly spends all day every day #disrupting and #innovating, fighting the good fight. Tony's passion for building tools and solutions that equip publishers with business models to keep them around and thriving for decades to come is simply unmatched. Helping an entire industry change the way it does business through effective, sustainable metrics that measure the right goals isn't something that happens overnight. Thankfully, years of polar exploring, circumnavigating the globe in a sailboat, and working with fifty Chartteam misfits every day forces one to be creative and resilient.

We couldn't be prouder (or less surprised).

Check out Tony's Fast Company piece on being the leader of Chartbeat or follow him on Twitter to get that British charm delivered to you in real time.

Tony Haile

Chartbeat Chief Business Officer Shares 2014 “Sleeper Ideas” with Forbes

January 13th, 2014 by Juliana

john saroff forbes

Our Chief Business Officer John Saroff shares his predictions for soon-to-be major ideas and issues in 2014 with Forbes in the piece "The Best 'Sleeper Ideas' for Trends, Stocks, and Private Companies to Watch in 2014".

What's on John's "sleeper ideas" list? A wide spectrum: Better Metrics for Brand Advertising, Over-The-Top TV, and Inflation. Get the details on John's picks – and read what other business and tech visionaries named as sleeper ideas in the full article here.

Have something to say about John's selections? Give him a shout on Twitter or throw your ideas in the Comments and he'll respond.

   

Check Out Chartbeat, Tony Haile in Salon

October 28th, 2013 by Juliana

salon logo

“It’s been the feeling that following metrics too closely is corruptive to good quality journalism,” Haile said. “I think if you’re following the wrong metrics that’s true.”

Salon has a big story today about Chartbeat and our CEO Tony Haile. Writer Alex Halperin discusses online journalism in the era of listicles, click-based metrics, and frequent debate regarding what topics merit coverage, and how Chartbeat may continue to shake things up in the industry – for the better, we think(!). The article features real talk with Tony about measuring content quality and value through audience engagement, click-bait journalism, and where he thinks online publishing is heading.

Here's the whole article and enjoy the excerpt below. If you have questions or comments, tweet at Tony – he'd love to hear from you.

But as Haile presents it, Chartbeat wants to change the data editors and, more importantly, advertisers care about. He thinks this could improve journalism’s quality by reducing the incentive to write click-bait headlines, produce unnecessary slideshows, pointlessly paginate articles and indulge in other chicanery to inflate page views.

Raising page views for its own sake, “Doesn’t help the audience,” Haile said. “The advertiser doesn’t get anything more from it. It’s just a way of gaming the numbers.”

“If [a headline reads] ‘Prince William caught in love triangle,’ it doesn’t matter what the story says,” Haile said. “I’ve got that click, I’ve got that page view. So it lends itself to lower quality.” But in a media climate where every post is judged on its own terms — whether it’s a war zone dispatch or a curated list of tweets about “Mad Men” – how can quality be measured?

Haile thinks the crucial metric should be time, how long a page captures readers’ attention. He believes that articles that engage readers, and are therefore more likely to create a loyal audience, should be worth more to advertisers. That might sound simple, but almost two decades into the era of online media, the industry hasn’t been able to make that happen.

- From "This man decides what you read", Salon

Watch This: Chartbeat Data Science at DataGotham 2013

October 23rd, 2013 by Juliana

Chartbeat Data Scientist Josh Schwartz spoke a few weeks ago at DataGotham about his series of lab studies on how users read content – and how that research drives insights across our network.

You can now watch his talk in this blog post or on YouTube and get the scoop on what we're cooking up these days in the Chartbeat Data Science Lab.

Got a question for Josh? You can reach him here.