Archive for the ‘News & Press’ Category

It’s a social world out there, folks, and we know that means your content doesn’t just live on your site anymore. Enter: Chartbeat Offsite Social. Powered by CrowdTangle and available to clients of both CrowdTangle Pro and Chartbeat Publishing, Offsite Social gives you an expanded view of article performance so that you can understand how the articles you write get read and distributed on social platforms.

We’re trying to close the social gap between understanding the data behind articles posted on your site and social activity surrounding your articles offsite in real time. A new lens on your data shows you how your article is performing on social platforms including Facebook, Instagram, and Reddit, to give you a complete view of your articles: not just who’s reading them on your site, but who’s sharing, liking, and talking about them across social media channels. Read more about the feature here

 

What will this let me do?

Know at a glance where your stories are being picked up, how they’re being viewed, and how many readers are interacting with them – in real time – so you can do something about it in the moment: participate in the conversation, promote the story elsewhere, or identify prominent influencers for your brand.

 

How do I get in on this?

We’re opening up our beta! If you’d like to learn more or find out how you can become a beta partner for the Offsite Social feature, reach out to offsitesocial@chartbeat.com.

Today at F8 the Facebook team announced opening their Instant Articles to all publishers. Their aim is to make a better, faster mobile reading experience for all Facebook users. We’re thrilled to be an inaugural partner and to officially announce our launch of Facebook Instant Article tracking within Chartbeat tools.

Inside the Dashboard

Within the Chartbeat Publishing dashboard, we’ve added a section on the left-hand side labeled Distribution. Here, alongside the Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) integration, this section will display the percentage of concurrent visitors engaging with your Facebook Instant Article content.

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You’ll see this fancy new field once you’ve integrated Facebook Instant Articles with Chartbeat.

Quick tip: You can check the Facebook Instant Article box to pivot the entire Dashboard to show how this discrete audience is consuming your content, engaging on the page, etc. You can do the same with AMP, App or Site traffic within the Distribution section to assess exactly where and how your audience is consuming content in real time.

Within Report Builder

As you and your editorial and analytics teams are continuously building and testing new strategies to reach new audiences, we’re busy building new ways to help you understand which channels are working to build, grow, and monetize that audience—and which need some fresh thinking and tinkering.

Enter: Distribution segmentation within our Report Builder tool. Once you Report Builder users have implemented Facebook Instant Articles, you’ll immediately be able to track how your Instant Article readers engage month to month, day to day, or even down to the minute of the day.

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So what’s next?

Facebook Instant Articles let your team build loyalty and brand awareness of your content—and engage with that content quickly and completely. In the past we’ve found engagement metrics to be a direct correlation with audience loyalty, so the more they read your content, the better — wherever they are. Using this data, we hope to see your team adapting their distribution strategies in real time and over time.

But you tell us. We’re eager to hear how your team is building out a strategy for Facebook Instant Articles and how we can help. If you’re up for a chat with our Product team, let us know.

If you’re ready to get started with our Facebook Instant Articles integration right away, check out the documentation here.

Beginning several days ago (the evening of Tuesday, 1/20, to be precise), you may have noticed a significant increase in the traffic on your site from LinkedIn: across our network, traffic from linkedin.com increased by over 3x. Below, we’ll detail why that change occurred, and what publishers should expect going forward.

Over the past year, publishers have become increasingly interested in traffic from LinkedIn, as the LinkedIn team has been steadily working to improve their feed experience with the launch of their new mobile app and content platforms. Nevertheless, when looking at referrer traffic in analytics tools like Chartbeat, web traffic from linkedin.com has always seemed smaller than it should for such a large platform, especially given the volume of traffic we see from LinkedIn’s counterpart apps, which shows up under the referrer name lnkd.in.

On January 20th, that changed when LinkedIn made a change to correctly attribute their traffic, some of which had previously been categorized as dark social. The impact of that change was immediate and significant.

Let’s look at traffic coming from linkedin.com to sites across the Chartbeat network over the last six months, we see two trends: a steady increase over the year, followed by a huge increase at the end of January.

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Zooming in on the right side of the graph, January, 2016, we can see the immediate change in traffic as the attribution change was pushed:

linkedin_02_v3If we compare numbers from just after the change to the same time during previous weeks, traffic from linkedin.com was up by over 3x.

Some sites saw more than 6x increases in their LinkedIn traffic.

While LinkedIn still isn’t a major traffic source for many types of sites, we expect that many business-, media-, and technology-focused sites will see LinkedIn as a top-10 referrer going forward.

With Facebook’s change last year to help attribute all of their traffic, LinkedIn’s change here, and other work to come, we’re excited to see more traffic correctly attributed. We’ll continue to work with platforms in the coming months to bring their dark social traffic into the light.

The refrain is that when it comes to mobile the open web has had its moment and just can’t compete in a world of apps. While apps and the content within those apps (like Facebook’s Instant Articles) load blisteringly fast for a seamless user experience, the open mobile web is lethargic at best, weighted down with redundant code, crappy ads, and too many trackers. When we should be marveling at the instant access to the sum of the world’s knowledge from a device the size of a slice of bread, we spend our time staring frustrated at a loading bar and often just give up.

We have a choice.

We can choose to see the open web as a relic of its time and flee to the warm embrace of platforms and apps. Or we can say that the open web means something important to the world and if it’s broken it’s our job to fix it. I think we should fix it.

The open web has offered equality of access and information to the world. It’s meant that a generation’s unfiltered voice could make itself heard. It’s led to one of the greatest explosions of innovation the planet has ever seen. That wasn’t an app. That was all of us. And that’s important.

That’s why Chartbeat is — and I personally am — proud to partner with Google and many other media and tech companies to support and build the Accelerated Mobile Pages Project. It’s our attempt to fix the mobile experience and ensure the future of the open web.

What is AMP?

The AMP project is an open source initiative to deliver a significantly lighter-weight version of a webpage so that content on that page loads instantly, regardless of mobile, desktop, or any other format. It solves this problem at the page-level, not the platform-level. That means no matter if you discovered an article on Twitter, Globo or the Guardian; whether you open it with Chrome or Firefox; or whether you’re reading it on your iPhone or Droid, if the content was created in an Accelerated Mobile Page, you’ll have the same lightning-fast performance. It shouldn’t matter where you came from, you should get the same perfect user experience.

From the content-creator and publisher perspective, open really means open. Anything you publish using AMP HTML will look the same and load with the same speed no matter where or how your readers read it. It’s not a Google-specific link or a fix for only Twitter readers. It allows all of us to use the same open tools to create sophisticated reading experiences for the same open web.

How is Chartbeat involved?

Richard Gingras at Google reached out to us and asked us to be the founding analytics partner for the AMP project. I’ve always believed in the open web (my first startup was an ill-fated attempt to make OpenID popular) and we leapt at the chance to make the web better.

Our particular piece of the puzzle is working out how to make sure that analytics can have as close to zero effect on page load as possible.

Right now, when websites load, multiple analytics services load code that does largely the same thing. That means slower pages in exchange for little positive effect. It would be much better to have just one super-fast snippet of code load and report back on what’s happening on the page. That’s our job to figure out. We’ll be working to shape the universal metrics AMP will report on.

Our goal is to be able to enable the same level of insight for media companies while dramatically improving user experience.

What do we hope will come of this?

We hope the different media companies and tech services that support them can come together around this open-source standard and build a web we can be proud of. Just like the open web, anyone can create a page using AMP, whether you are a blogger in New Zealand or a mogul in New York. With the industry coming together around common standards it means that improving the page load of Vox also improves the page load of the New York Times. It becomes less about any one site becoming better and more about the entire web experience getting better.

At its core it’s a simple mission. Letting the web once again become a source of wonder rather than a source of frustration.

Facebook announced today that it’s updating its News Feed ranking in an effort to show users more of the content that matters to them. The social network will now be factoring in how much time a user spends viewing a story in his or her News Feed.

How is this different from what they’ve done in the past?
Traditionally, Facebook has relied on people’s actions—liking, commenting or sharing a post—to determine what should appear at the top of a user’s News Feed. However, after surveying a number of people about how they use their News Feed, researchers concluded that these factors don’t always indicate whether the content was meaningful to a person.

They found, in many cases, that a user may have chosen not to like or comment on a story, but he or she still found the story to be important or interesting.

“We’ve discovered that if people spend significantly more time on a particular story in News Feed than the majority of other stories they look at, this is a good sign that content was relevant to them.

Based on the fact that you didn’t scroll straight past [a] post and it was on the screen for more time than other posts that were in your News Feed, we infer that it was something you found interesting and we may start to surface more posts like that higher up in your News Feed in the future.”

Why is this a big deal for publishers?
These new updates, along with the News Feed algorithm changes Facebook made last August to combat clickbait, show they’re taking important steps toward surfacing quality content that captures and holds readers’ attention. And as the social network continues to lean on the fundamental ideas of the Attention Web, quality content stands to win big.

Naturally, we’re pretty excited about these changes. For the better part of a decade, Chartbeat has been talking about getting the industry to align the quality of content with the value of a page, instead of with empty clicks and impressions. We’ve been building products around Engaged Time (methodology here for the curious) on written and video content and around Active Exposure Time and Lifetime Exposure with display ads to make it easier for content creators and advertisers to do so.

The more we work together as an industry — publishers, advertisers, platforms, and other tech companies — to reward the best content on the internet, the better the internet as a whole becomes. We’re looking forward to seeing how other major media players follow in Facebook’s footsteps.