Archive for the ‘The Chartcorps’ Category

Social platforms are playing an increasingly important role in how visitors access your content and discover your brand—currently about 22% of the attributable external traffic we measure comes from social sources. Is your social strategy up to the challenge? Armed with Chartbeat’s tools you can easily take advantage of your social presence with real-time tips and historical insights.

 

Real-Time Toolbox

 

The Big Board

Unite the entire newsroom around common metrics by displaying your real-time social data on the big screen.

The Chartbeat Big Board is perfect for those large screen displays in your newsroom. Configure the Big Board to show only social traffic, and see at a glance when something important is happening with your content—then jump to your Dashboard to take action.

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Once you’ve moved to your Dashboard, first pivot on the ‘social’ traffic source. And if you want to make sure you’re always coming back to that view, you can even bookmark it in your browser for easy access!

Now that you’re looking at just your social data, you can really start defining your social strategy:

  1. Determine the best times of the day to push your content to your social audience.
    Look at the 7-day view in the ‘Concurrents by Traffic Source’ graph to determine what times of day your site attracts the most readers from social.Don’t just look at the largest spikes and valleys — are there consistently smaller traffic influxes in the late afternoon or evening? Are you capitalizing on these times by pushing your best content to your social channels?

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  2. Understand your mobile audience’s experience.
    Social traffic is dramatically more mobile-based than all other traffic: according to Chartbeat data, Facebook’s share of overall mobile referrals is 4x larger than its share on desktop, and Twitter’s share is 3.6x larger on mobile than on desktop.Use the device section to double pivot on mobile and see which articles are seeing the most engagement on smartphones—what does that mobile experience look like for those readers? Can they easily find additional content? Already using Facebook’s new Instant Article technology to further serve your content to a mobile, social audience? We can help with that. Once you’ve set up Chartbeat’s FBIA integration you can easily see how many readers of a story are engaging with your Instant Article content. Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 10.43.30 AM

    Looking to get integrated? We’ve got you covered.

     

  3. Know which content to promote on which social channel.
    Facebook and Twitter are two of the most established and wide-reaching social channels to reach new readers, but how can you be strategic about which content to promote with which referrer?While Facebook and Twitter might lead to similar reader engagements, what’s important is their key loyalty indicator: recirculation for Facebook and engagement exceeding one minute for Twitter. So what do you do?

    • Sort the Top Pages section by recirculation and find your top three articles that are doing the best job at encouraging readers to dive deeper into your content. Push them on Facebook during your peak times of day for your best shot at audience conversion.
    • Toggle the Top Pages by Engaged Time and to find the content that’s holding the most attention—any of them racking up over a minute of Engaged Time? Now promote those stories on Twitter during your peak hours and really capture the attention of those readers.

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Historical Insights

 

Report Builder

Go back in time and find existing content that brought in engaged social traffic.

Set up a report to hit your inbox every month to surface your top 10 articles that got the most attention from social sources—regardless of when they were published.

Now you can build a running list of go-to list of evergreen articles that you should continue to work in to your promotion on a regular basis. And by comparing these reports month over month, you can identify star performers that consistently bring in more social traffic than the rest. These top performing articles should become highlighted fixtures in your social promotion strategy.  

To get started with this report, select the following parameters in the Report Builder interface, and check out the screenshot below for extra detail:

Add metrics: Total engaged time (add this metric first to pull your top articles by total engaged seconds), Average engaged time, Unique cookies, Page views, Loyal visitor page views, Quality page views

Add groups: Title, Author

Add filters: Page type (select ‘Article’ from the drop-down), Referrer Type (select ‘social’ from the drop-down)

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If you’re a little rusty, check out our support site for more information on these metrics.

Want even more insights on setting your social strategy? Check out our Social Media Insider Guide here.

 

You’ve heard this story before—boy graduates college, boy moves to New York, boy starts working at a tech startup full of cool nerds, boy finds a career path.

Read the rest of this entry »

This is the second post in a series on how we used the design process to prototype, build, and test a brand new support site.

By collaborating with our designers, the Chartcorps (our client support team) was able to create a brand new support site experience from scratch. Last week, my teammate Chris walked us through the first three steps of our design process that began with understanding, defining, and ideating a solution to a problem. This week, I’ll be discussing how we took those ideas from the whiteboard to the web in the next three phases: prototyping, building, and testing.

Phase 4: Prototype

In the Ideate phase, we were able to lay out the informational groundwork, but we still needed to figure out details around navigational flow and visual consistency.

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An early mockup of navigation and flow.

Chris and I used Sketch and InVision to generate quick wireframes to get a better sense of how users could interact with the site. We made a few versions to compare and get feedback from the rest of the team and our designers — an incredibly useful step for planning how to scale our site for future resources.

After finalizing the overall structure, we moved on to higher fidelity mockups to find a consistent style and voice for our product. We wanted the support site to feel like an extension of the tools that customers were used to using, but also serve as an easy channel to connect with us.

Thankfully, our designers had already put together a style guide that helped us quickly get from wireframes to mockups. We replaced our Lorem Ipsum with real text, drew our own illustrations, and decided on a unique, but integrated, color theme.

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Palette from our Style Guide

We found that prototyping was a quick and efficient method to diverge and converge on many ideas with constant revisions along the way. And since Chris and I were new to coding, prototyping helped us nail down design decisions before tackling code.

Phase 5: Build

When new members of Chartcorps come on board, we encourage everyone to get comfortable with code using resources such as Harvard’s online CS50 course, Codecademy, and Learn Python the Hard Way (which Chartbeat Developers actually TA once a week for the whole company!). Chris and I had also learned a lot on the job, but we really wanted to take all this knowledge and build something ourselves.

We were familiar with writing HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, but putting everything all together in a cohesive, scalable system was a brand new experience for us. Enter, the static-site generator—we choose Jekyll.

jekyll
There are a lot of different options out there, but after we experimented with both traditional CMS’s and static-site generators, we found that the latter offered better version control and flexibility for what we were trying to build. Jekyll was our favorite because it was beginner-friendly and a few of our designers had experience using it.

While building the site, we found a lot of parallels with the design process. We spent a lot of time understanding, ideating, and prototyping different file structures to reflect the design of the site from the user’s view. We ended up using a cascade of templates and section-specific files to have a modular site that new members of Chartcorps could easily add to or edit.

Phase 6: Iterate & Learn

After many weeks of coding we were finally at the point of launch! We decided to start off with a soft roll out to test and get more feedback.

We held various focus groups with members of our Product Outreach Team to see if they could find all the resources in their new locations. We also attended the design review meetings that our Design and Marketing teams hold bi-weekly for additional feedback.

Of course the last step of any design process is continuous iteration. Since this is our first run at building a whole support site from conception to execution, we’d love to hear your thoughts: What are we missing? Does the structure make sense? Did you find what you were looking for?

Just as Chris and I used this project as a chance to practice and learn, it’s had a similar effect on everyone on Chartcorps. One of our teammates, who’s more interested in data and integrations than front-end design, used API endpoints from the Chartbeat Status Page to power a real-time widget to instantly tip people off to any downgraded performance issues!

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Check it out, we’re live!

The Support Site project that Chris and I set out to build is becoming much more than just a side project for us. It’s turning into a way for all members of Chartcorps to explore and develop their technical skills and interests.

For Chris and me, it’s been learning more about what the web design process looks like in software companies, and how something goes from sketch, to design, to launch. And since we had such a great time collaborating with and learning from Chartbeat design team, we’re going to continue publishing blog posts about our Design culture.

P.S. Want to join our team? We’re hiring: Chartcorps, Product Design, and Marketing Design. Check out the openings here.

ICYMI: Last week, our Chartcorps and Data Science teams hosted a Q&A webinar covering the latest mobile research from our spring Quarterly issue. You can check out a full recording of the webinar (or read the Cliff Notes version) here.

You asked, we answered.

Attendees asked lots of great questions during last week’s mobile research findings webinar—some of which we didn’t have a chance to answer during the live Q&A session:

What are some strategies for increasing pageviews per user on mobile devices?

Whether you’re promoting your site on social media or deciding which articles to put on a landing page, consider sending traffic to pages with high mobile recirculation, which tend to drive readers further into your site.

Filter on the “mobile” platform in the Chartbeat Publishing Dashboard and sort your Top Pages section by Recirculation to quickly see which articles are doing the best at driving your audience deeper into your site.

To increase mobile recirculation on a particular page, take a look at where mobile visitors scroll to before leaving, either in real-time with the Heads Up Display or historically with Report Builder.


How can digital publishers tailor content better for mobile platforms?

With mobile platforms, the best way to optimize for your audience is to make sure that the most viewable part of the page—just below the digital fold—is set up for success. Are you giving your audience a chance to move on to additional content before that first big drop off? And if they do drop off after that point, are they at least leaving with a strong takeaway from the article?

If you’re constantly tracking your mobile audience, you’ve probably also noticed trends in terms of which referrers typically send traffic via mobile devices, and even what time of day you usually see the highest amount of mobile traffic. These insights can all inform you on when and where to promote your mobile stories.

Track the second-by-second, pixel-by-pixel attention of your audience with our Editorial Dashboard.

Have you noticed a difference in mobile consumption with the increased popularity of “phablets” — larger screen phones like the iPhone 6 plus or the Galaxy Note 4?

Right now we break down devices into three categories—desktop, mobile, and tablet—so we haven’t looked at any trends yet in the various kinds of mobile devices, but we’ll keep it in mind.


How do you measure scroll depth in the case of these studies?

To measure maximum scroll depth, we look at the the furthest point a user scrolled on the page, as tracked by our pinger, a piece of Chartbeat javascript that runs in your browser. Note that maximum scroll depth isn’t necessarily the point at which you left the page, although the two are often the same number.

To get the maximum scroll depth data for the Data Science Quarterly, we used the same data store that feeds our Report Builder.


What kind of correlation have you seen between scroll depth on landing pages and pageviews per visit?

We haven’t done a study on this correlation yet, but if you’re using the Report Builder tool you can build recurring reports tracking pageviews and unique visitors for a specific page.

Set metrics to “pageviews” and “unique cookies” and set a page path filter equal to “/” — the path of your homepage — and filter on device type equals mobile. That way you can keep track of the numbers for your own homepage day in and day out and discover any trends that might be unique to your own audience. (For more tips and tricks check out Report Builder 101).

Learn more about our suite of editorial tools here. Questions? Shoot us a note or check out our Chartcorps Support Site.

Headline Testing 101

June 24th, 2015 by Chris

Already familiar with Chartbeat Engaged Headline Testing?
Hop down to our 101 section for tips on how to get the most out of your headline tests.

BUT, WHAT IS ENGAGED HEADLINE TESTING?

Engaged Headline Testing is like a laboratory. In this lab, you run the experiments. You determine the variables. But we provide the measurements. Our algorithm handles the heavy lifting. Engaged Headline Testing maximizes the effectiveness of your content by combining your own editorial expertise with real-time performance metrics.

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You’ve got the great content—but are people seeing it? Are you driving readers to your most engaging content—the content that will keep them coming back again and again? Engaged Headline Testing helps you get to know your audience on a deeper level and promote your content with headlines that you know are more likely to grab—and keep—readers’ attention.

You’ll know which headlines resonate best with readers so you can increase engagement—and improve headline writing in the process.


WHAT MAKES ENGAGED HEADLINE TESTING UNIQUE?

We understand that audience attention is an important measure of success. Chartbeat Engaged Headline Testing identifies not only the headlines that are being clicked on, but also the ones that lead to engagement with your content. Using our Quality Clicks metric, the testing tool tallies the clicks that correspond to a user actively engaging with your content for at least 15 seconds after clicking the headline.

Clicks are not enough; your most successful headlines are those that grab users’ attention and position engaging content. Engaged Headline Testing ensures your headlines do both.



HOW DOES IT WORK?

The setup is simple: pick a story that you want to test headlines for, enter a series of different headlines, and launch the experiment. Chartbeat then serves those different headlines to your audience and measures how many clicks each version receives—and more importantly how much Engaged Time those visitors spend consuming the content. Tests run in real-time, weighting the winning headlines based on what’s driving the most post-click engagement with each audience.


Ready to upgrade to the Engaged Headline Testing tool? Let your account manager know—or shoot us a note to learn more.


Headline Testing 101

WHAT SHOULD MY EXPERIMENTS LOOK LIKE?

Since a headline test is an experiment, you should structure it that way — hypothesis, variables, results, and conclusions.

1. Leverage your own experience and insight. When deciding on headline variants, consider what kinds of headlines have been successful in the past. Maybe one that’s interrogative, one with numbers, and another written in the second person.

2. It’s multivariate headline testing after all, you’re not limited to two choices. Pick a series of different kinds of headlines, at least 4 or 5. And make sure they’re different.

3. Make sure your headlines are different. You’re testing to see how your audience reacts to different styles and tones, not slight changes in word order or punctuation.

4. Analyze your results. Look back at those headline writing strategies you started with. Were your hypotheses correct? Every time an experiment completes, you have a chance to learn a little bit more about your audience’s preferences and how they respond to different styles of headlines. Which approaches were more successful? Under what conditions? Do certain approaches work better against certain content topics (e.g. sports or tech or entertainment)?

Chartcorps Insight: High clicks with low engagement might mean that the headline didn’t communicate the message of the article. Is your headline too sensational, too much of a stretch? Low clicks with high engagement can tell you that the article could use more exposure. Have you shared it on social media, are you linking to it from your home page or other article pages?

5. Apply your findings time and time again. Some of the best headline testers write wrap reports and have daily meetings to go over results. Creating and sharing a summary of the insights you gained from previous experiments helps all editors and content producers benefit and learn.

6. Test again.
And again. Test deliberately and in ways that confirm or deny a single hypotheses.


WHAT ELSE SHOULD I KNOW ABOUT ENGAGED HEADLINE TESTING?

  • Always be testing — since there’s no limit on how many experiments you can run at the same time, you always have the opportunity to learn from your audience’s behavior.
  • Know which audience you’re testing — homepage audiences are usually loyal and visitors from social tend to be new, so it’s likely they’ll prefer different headlines.
  • Don’t stop tests prematurely — it might be tempting to stop a test when one headline quickly takes the lead, but you’re likely to see cases where the tides shift halfway through the experiment and the initial success trails off.
  • Don’t get discouraged by a tie — it’s possible that two great headlines are attracting similar levels of engagement. If you’re frequently seeing similar results, it might be that the headlines you’re testing are too similar.
  • Higher traffic pages will turn results faster — since experiments are based on how many clicks your articles are getting, a bigger audience means more clicks.
  • Ready to get started with Chartbeat Engaged Headline Testing? Want to learn more? Get in touch.