Posts Tagged ‘Social traffic’

The Whole Point of Social Traffic

January 28th, 2013 by Doug

Chartbeat Publishing: Exploring the Social View
As a member of the Chartcorps, our Chartbeat Publishing clients ask me all the time how they should be using the Social View. What are best practices, what are the other guys using it for and to what effect, that kind of stuff. In a nutshell, the Social View helps you understand more about why readers are sharing your articles, what they're talking about in relation to you and your content offsite, and how you can instantly spot every possible opportunity to grow your audience.  

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Social View 101
The Social View shows you how people are sharing your content on Twitter and Facebook. You have a feed in your dashboard of everyone who’s promoting your story and how they’re doing so. You can put a face to your legions of fans. But more than that - and of course more important than that - you know who is advocating for you and can act as a content guide for you. The content that resonates with your core audience will bring them back again and again leading to not just return visits, but a loyal audience. And every article is an opportunity to build those loyalists.
Readers connecting with your content
With the Social View, you have insider access to the conversation surrounding your story – why people find it interesting, what elements of the story are compelling enough that people are sharing that link. Sure, you can always look at the comments section on your page, but with the Social View you’re not limited just to your commenting audience, which is generally a small portion of the most outspoken in the bunch - you can see everyone who’s tweeting a link to that story. This gives you a real sense of the relationships readers are establishing with your content and therefore you (read: more loyalists.) 

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It's all about tactical insights
Knowing who loves your content, who's sharing it, and when doesn't amount to more than a pat on the back - unless you do something about it. The data you’re getting from your Social View helps you execute on your content strategy. Once your story’s out in the world, it's time for you to make some key, traffic-driving decisions. Maybe your story’s current title doesn’t reflect why your readers find that story compelling (your concurrents are lower than you know they should be), so you could switch in a new headline that relates to those specific story points that your Twitter fam is calling out most. Or maybe, in response to a specific point your readers are hung up on, you can edit that piece to add some clarification or further insights or get a followup piece up and live ASAP. There are always ways to build on the dialogue your initial story started - the beauty of the social web means news is never finished. Chartbeat data's just like a compass for your editorial strategy. You can't possibly pay 100% attention to every scroll, every tweet, every share - but Social View points you to the ones you do need to see, the impact makers, the audience builders. But share in the comments how you've used social traffic and to what effect. And as always, feel free to shoot me an email if you have any questions.    

Introducing: New Social View

July 3rd, 2012 by Alex Carusillo

For a lot of people, traffic from social networks can be seen as this big unknown cannon of people who can't be totally controlled or understood. Sure, tweets drive a bunch of traffic, but it can be ridiculously hard to understand which 140-character thought has people banging on your door, and which was ignored. Trying to understand how people feel about you while streams of text about your site, the topics you care about, and #yolo rush by is an impossible challenge. And that's always bugged us because social is so crazy important. When something goes viral on a social network your whole audience changes. It's no longer just your loyal fans - now you've got to think about people who've never heard of you before or, at best, people who don't know much about you. Getting those people to your site and making sure they know you're out there is the difference between a good single day of traffic and a ton of new loyal fans. Chartbeat is all about making it absurdly easy to see the important stuff that is happening right now and opening the door to actions that push the dial to its limit. No better place to do that than on social networks.

So today we're launching the reimagined Chartbeat social view. And it's way more than just a new set of graphs.

Our Social View is here to answer two key questions:
  1. Is social driving traffic to my page?
  2. Is there a conversation about me that I should be a part of?
Together, they capture who you are on the social web and give you a chance to control that rush of people to point them toward the things you want them to see. The most obvious addition to the view is the stream on the right. Once you link up your Twitter handle, we start tracking everyone who mentions you, and because we're already on your page, we also track every link to your site. It's not enough to just know when people are speaking directly to you, calling for your attention - you've also got to know when they're talking about you and don't care if you see it. By knowing when people are linking to you (even if they're not mentioning you by name), you can really understand how people see you. But monitoring alone is no good if you can't act. Which is why if you hover on any tweet you can now reply, retweet, or favorite. Right from your dashboard, you can understand what the conversation around your site looks like and jump in when you need to. Throw favorites or retweets to your fans, and be there to transform people with questions into loyal fans. Just as monitoring alone isn't enough, action doesn't mean much if you can't see if it's actually driving people to your page. We're on that one, too. In the top graph, we're now showing both tweets from your account and every mention, retweet, and link. The more people talking about you the higher those Twitter blue circles will shoot up. It's no use talking if no one is listening, so we'll always be there to tell you if you're sending the right kind of messages. Having people talk about you is good - having them visit your webpage where you control the content you want them to is even better, so now we're showing those conversations alongside your site's social traffic. Those rushes of activity should be sending people to your page, and if they're not, we want you to know right away. If you're the topic of conversation you should know and you should be able to drive those people to your website.

So get social.

Head into your dashboard, link your Twitter and Facebook accounts, and let's see how much more you can do with your social data and social traffic now. As always, this is just the start. We're going to be adding more networks, more data, and more ways to help you kill it out there. If you've got any questions don't hesitate to email us or sign up for our weekly Chartcorps workshops to get the inside scoop on how you can use each of our features and real-time data in general to act.

Sneak Peek: It’s about to get REAL Social

June 21st, 2012 by Oli Olafsson

How well do you know your social audience? I mean really know them - not just that they come from Facebook, but how they interact and engage with your content?
Well, after we launch our brand new version of Social View for the Chartbeat dashboard next week, you’ll know them a whole lot better.
Alongside Social Concurrents, you’ll see a completely redesigned and pivotable Social Timeline. What about tweeting directly from the dashboard? That might be coming your way too... But we’ve said far too much already. Check back next week for the whole shebang!

Your Site, the Socialite: Introducing Social View & iOS Tracking Beta

May 3rd, 2012 by Doug

The world outside your website is tough to manage. You have die-hard fans extolling you in 140 characters. You have newbies who aren’t quite your target stumbling upon you via, er, StumbleUpon. And your regular guys constantly checking up on you through their iPhone apps. For a long time people have looked at the social audience, in particular, as its own discrete segment living in a vacuum to be treated totally differently from the rest of your audience. But really, they affect your site traffic and engage with your content like everyone else, don’t they? Shouldn’t you know just how much they're affecting your site? We sure think so. So within the new Social View on your Chartbeat dashboard, you’ll see the whole world of your social visitors. There’s a ton of easy-to-digest information about what’s going on with your site as seen through the social web.

In a single view, you can see what people are saying about you, how many of your current visitors came from social channels, and what pages are powerhouses on social networks. Social traffic can make the difference between an ordinary day and an extraordinary day. It’s important that you can now dig through that list of your most social pages and figure out what makes them different, so you can get the same kind of oomph out of the rest of your pages. If you see a big spike in traffic at the same time as you’re blowing up on Twitter, embrace it – see what people are saying, engage in conversation, retweet. People want to interact with you – make it easy for them to know there’s a real person behind all that HTML...

...and behind all that iOS code.

Your iPhone and iPad app is kind of like an entirely different site. It reaches a potentially totally new audience for you. It's important to track the differences between your site and your apps. So, we’re beta testing an iOS app tracking feature, too. If you have an iPhone or iPad app, install away through your dashboard sites page and let us know what you think. (Remember: the key word is “beta,” so we’re looking for your feedback and understanding that it’s not done yet). And don’t forget to sign up for the Chartcorps virtual workshop to get a more in-depth look at social, iOS tracking and everything in between.

Your Social Traffic is Higher Than You Think

February 14th, 2012 by Lauryn

Direct traffic. It’s a nebulous beast. Most web analytics products toss any visitor without referrer information into this category. That means any number of people like those who have:
  • Typed in the exact URL
  • Bookmarked the URL
  • Come from a URL using HTTPS
  • Clicked on a link from a non-browser-based application (e.g., email, Twitter, IM)
That last point is the tricky bit, right? We live in the social web now, and we have for quite some time. For your team to not know how important email, Twitter, or IM is to your site traffic because it’s being thrown into some Direct Traffic black hole isn't productive - it's hindering and frankly inexcusable at this point. Our Newsbeat crew wasn’t having it. So we decided to fix it. We met with some of our alpha partners, had a few chats, and came to the conclusion that users generally only type in the exact URL or bookmark a link if it’s a key landing page (e.g., forbes.com or forbes.com/opinions/). That makes sense, right? For new and transient articles, it’s highly unlikely anyone going to type the direct path to the page. (e.g., “http://gizmodo.com/5884660/mattel-is-finally-making-the-back-to-the-future-hoverboard”. ) It’s pretty clear that people without referrer information who visit articles like that will have received the link from someone else via a social app like Tweetdeck or Yahoo Mail and shouldn't be counted as Direct Traffic. So within Newsbeat, our data scientists - with the typical magic and fairy dust you’ve come to expect from their algorithm genius - programmatically classify these kinds of pages into two types: articles and landing pages. We feel confident that those long, complicated linked articles can be pulled out of the Direct Traffic bucket and can live under Social with a referrer of “Email, Apps, IM.” Traffic with unknown referral data for landing pages, the shorter, simpler links will stay as Direct, and we label them with an “L" for landing page.
Basically, we just took some time to really understand and identify the purpose of each page from your user’s point of view. That led us to understand what Direct Traffic means on a more intelligent level. And that allows you, in turn, to understand your users on a more intelligent level. What does all this mean in the end? It means you should go buy your social team a beer - they’re doing a lot more than most people give them credit for.