Archive for the ‘News & Press’ Category

The Financial Times Talks Ads, Viewability, and Chartbeat with ClickZ

March 13th, 2014 by Juliana

Curious to know what one of the boldest minds in online advertising is thinking about these days? Check out what Jon Slade, Commercial Director for Global Digital Advertising and Insight for the Financial Times, shares in a recent piece by ClickZ, "The Financial Times’ Perspective on Ad Viewability."

In this pithy piece, Slade talks about industry concerns surrounding viewability as it embarks on its path to standardization and the “critical issue” of accurately measuring impressions. We were excited to get a shout-out from Slade, who mentioned the work Chartbeat and the Financial Times have been doing together regarding the application of audience attention metrics to new and premium types of display advertising formats. Slade states:
“In addition to optimizing our site to ensure maximum viewability for our clients, we’re also working with Chartbeat to measure not just whether an ad is seen or not, but for how long. We believe that the amount of time the target audience is exposed to the advertiser’s message has a direct effect on its impact. We can tell our clients how long each impression has been viewed, and the total duration of exposure across the campaign.

In essence, there’s no reason why publishers’ can’t start to trade ‘exposed time’ as a currency, not just impressions. This is a metric that we feel is closer to the actual outcome an advertiser is seeking – impressions themselves are just a convenient mechanism to trade.”

We don’t think we could have said it any better ourselves. In response to this piece, Chartbeat ads product guy Alex Carusillo notes, “Viewability is really important and should happen no matter what. But we think what comes next is the most exciting part. When you look at Active Exposure Time, that black box of viewability opens up and you can see the difference between good and bad impressions. We're lucky to be partnering with Jon and the FT to turn audience attention into something publishers can build businesses on.”

Check out this visualization below to get a sense of how Chartbeat metrics can measure impression quality:

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Do you have questions about this stuff? Or maybe something to say? Let us know in the comments below.

4 Myths About the Web, by CEO Tony Haile

March 10th, 2014 by Kyle

Writing for Time.com yesterday, our fearless leader Tony Haile thoroughly debunked four myths about the Web. It turns out, clicking on an article isn't the same thing as actually reading it, there's no relationship between social sharing and engagement, native advertising has an attention deficit disorder, and conventional wisdom about ad placement is totally upside down. We're outlining a few key highlights here, but we'd strongly encourage you to check out the full article—it's a humdinger. (You will read the whole thing, won't you?)

#1: For starters, he says, we're mistakenly conflating clicking with reading: "For 20 years, publishers have been chasing pageviews, the metric that counts the number of times people load a web page. The more pageviews a site gets, the more people are reading, the more successful the site. Or so we thought." As many of us know by now, someone clicking on a provocative headline doesn't always translate into engagement—and, in fact, that's the case more often than not. So, it's crtical to ask, "What are my visitors doing after they click?"

myth-1

#2: Addressing another piece of conjecture, Tony challenges the assumption that social sharing and engagement have a directly proportional relationship. That is, "the more content is liked or shared, the more engaging it must be, the more willing people are to devote their attention to it." But, the data says it just ain't true: "We looked at 10,000 socially shared articles and found that there is no relationship whatsoever between the amount a piece of content is shared and the amount of attention an average reader will give that content."

myth-2

#3: While publishers and advertisers are giddy to saddle up and explore the new great frontier of native advertising, many are already on rocky footing: "Brands are paying for—and publishers are driving traffic to—content that does not capture the attention of its visitors or achieve the goals of its creators." But we shouldn't just give up on native advertising altogether. Native advertising that engages an audience and holds their attention can be influential, but "driving traffic to content that no one is reading is a waste of time and money."

http://time.com/12933/what-you-think-you-know-about-the-web-is-wrong/

#4: A successful ad needs two things: great creative and great placement. Unfortunately, conventional wisdom has led many to pay top dollar for the parts of the page that capture the least attention, not the most: "66% of attention on a normal media page is spent below the fold. That leaderboard at the top of the page? People scroll right past that and spend their time where the content not the cruft is. Yet most agency media planners will still demand that their ads run in the places where people aren’t and will ignore the places where they are."

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So, to the days of the click, we say sayonara. Now let's usher in the age of attention.

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CEO Tony Haile Named to Fast Company’s Most Creative People in Business 1000

January 29th, 2014 by Juliana

 

Tony Haile Chartbeat

Today Fast Company announced the Most Creative People in Business 1000 – with Chartbeat CEO Tony Haile included in the ranks. The MCP 1000 is described as "an influential, diverse group of modern Renaissance men and women across the economy and around the globe. This is more than just a list: It is a rising community, an explosion of creative inspiration, the spur for so much breaking news across the quickly changing industries that Fast Company covers."

Renaissance man, indeed. That baby-faced chap you know and love truly spends all day every day #disrupting and #innovating, fighting the good fight. Tony's passion for building tools and solutions that equip publishers with business models to keep them around and thriving for decades to come is simply unmatched. Helping an entire industry change the way it does business through effective, sustainable metrics that measure the right goals isn't something that happens overnight. Thankfully, years of polar exploring, circumnavigating the globe in a sailboat, and working with fifty Chartteam misfits every day forces one to be creative and resilient.

We couldn't be prouder (or less surprised).

Check out Tony's Fast Company piece on being the leader of Chartbeat or follow him on Twitter to get that British charm delivered to you in real time.

Tony Haile

The Chartbeat 2013 Annual Report Is Here!

January 21st, 2014 by Kate

   
chartbeat annual report
   

2013 was a pretty fantastic year for online publishing. You hit huge concurrent numbers and created some amazing content that kept readers coming back for more.

As a thank you for including Chartbeat in your year, we wanted to pull together some aggregated data highlights for you to celebrate because, let’s face it, we couldn’t have done it without you.

Check out the 2013 Chartbeat Annual Report here.

Chartbeat Chief Business Officer Shares 2014 “Sleeper Ideas” with Forbes

January 13th, 2014 by Juliana

john saroff forbes

Our Chief Business Officer John Saroff shares his predictions for soon-to-be major ideas and issues in 2014 with Forbes in the piece "The Best 'Sleeper Ideas' for Trends, Stocks, and Private Companies to Watch in 2014".

What's on John's "sleeper ideas" list? A wide spectrum: Better Metrics for Brand Advertising, Over-The-Top TV, and Inflation. Get the details on John's picks – and read what other business and tech visionaries named as sleeper ideas in the full article here.

Have something to say about John's selections? Give him a shout on Twitter or throw your ideas in the Comments and he'll respond.